Your search for water rivers and canals found 173 results

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Rivers & canals

Scotland’s river quality has improved in recent decades. Almost half of our rivers are now of good or better quality. Plans are in place to improve the remaining poorer-quality rivers.

State of the environment report 2011: Water - Rivers & canals

Scotland's rivers are an iconic part of the landscape, and an important contributor to industry, agriculture, tourism and people's quality of life. The health of our rivers has improved significantly in the last 25 years and half are now good or high quality, although there are still significant problems.

State of the environment report 2011: Wildlife - Rivers & lochs

Scotland has a considerable freshwater resource; 125,000 km of rivers, 27,000 lochs, 198,000 ponds and 220 km of canals. Freshwater wildlife is largely in good condition, reflecting long-term quality improvements. Some habitats and species are influenced by a range of impacts, including physical modifications and water abstraction, although the overall ecological condition of Scottish rivers and lochs is considered to be in a (generally) favourable state.

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Rivers & lochs

Scotland’s freshwaters provide a range of habitats for plants and animals. Overall, freshwater habitats and species are in good condition. However, while some individual habitats and species are improving, others are still under pressure.

The Conservation Volunteers: Rivers factsheet

Rivers are corridors of water transporting rain and snowmelt from where it falls, ultimately to the sea. They are also wildlife corridors offering plants and animals a route to spread, live and feed. Rivers are also transport routes for sediments and nutrients that feed into lakes, estuaries and coastal seas.

Water classification hub

The water classification hub is an interactive tool allowing you to explore the current and historical condition of Scotland’s rivers, lochs, estuaries, coasts and groundwaters, and bathing and shellfish water protected areas. Results are updated annually and include assessments of water quality, habitat condition, access for fish migration, water flows and levels and invasive non-native species, as defined by Scottish Government Directions and the Water Framework Directive

Water

Scotland's water is essential for our health and prosperity. As well as being used for drinking, water is used in industry, producing energy, and for recreational activities. Our water supports an array of habitats and contains nationally and internationally important species.

World water day

Yesterday was world water day and this year’s theme was “The answer is in nature” – exploring nature-based solutions to water challenges we face such as flooding and water pollution. Scotland has a rich and varied water environment, but other aspects of our environment have an important role to play in addressing some key challenges we face. You can find information and data about the water environment on Scotland’s environment web.

Water scarcity

Help SEPA to assess water scarcity stress and forecast, monitoring and report of the situation facing Scotland's water resources.

Stream water

Stream water

Bathing Water Catchments

Bathing water catchments

Baseline Water Body Inter Catchments

Baseline water body intercatchments

Water Monitoring Points

Water Monitoring Points

Scotland’s freshwater

Scotland’s freshwaters are essential for our health and prosperity. As well as being used for drinking, water is used by industry (e.g. distilling whisky and supporting fisheries), for producing energy (hydropower), and for recreational activities such as bird-watching, angling and water sports.

SPRI Waste Water releases

SPRI (Scottish Pollution Release Inventory) sites in Scotland - Waste water releases

SPRI Water releases

SPRI (Scottish Pollution Release Inventory) sites in Scotland which have water releases.

State of the environment report 2011: Water

Scotland’s water provides a wide range of benefits essential for our health and prosperity. These include providing drinking water, water for use in industry, energy from waves, tides and hydropower and recreation opportunities (such as bird watching, angling and kayaking). Our water supports a diverse array of habitats and contains nationally and internationally important populations of some species.

Water - Senior phase

This learning resource about water was written by a qualified school teacher and compliments the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. This is aimed at Senior level.

Water - Broad general education (Early to fourth level)

This learning resource about water was written by a qualified school teacher and compliments the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. This is aimed at Broad General Education - early to fourth level.

Water Regulation Zones

Water Supply Zones represent the extend of the area supplied by Scotland's water authority (Scottish Water). These zones represent the extent of the drinking water supply in a given area. The dataset is created new for each calendar year and remains fixed until the next year. The year is also known as the Reporting Year.

Water environment hub

River basin management planning is about protecting and improving Scotland’s water environment in a way that balances costs and benefits to the environment, society and economy. The water environment hub is an interactive tool allowing you to explore the river basin management plans, view details on all aspects of the water environment as well as download data. The water environment hub present the plans as a narrative to help easily navigate the data behind them, allowing anyone to view Scotland’s story or to find out their local area or even the nearest water courses story.

Water environment infographic

Water environment infographic showing the benefits, pressures and impacts

Get learning - Water

Get learning about water with this learning resource written by a qualified teacher that compliments the Scottish curriculum for excellence.

Drinking water Protected Areas (Surface)

The Drinking Water Protected Area (DWPA) (Surface water) dataset represents the individual surface water water bodies in Scotland. These have been defined by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency in line with the requirements of The Water Environment (Drinking Water Protected Areas) (Scotland) Order 2013. The dataset is required to fulfil the requirements of the European Union Water Framework Directive.

Drinking Water Protected Areas (Ground)

The Drinking Water Protected Area (DWPA) (Groundwater) dataset represents the individual groundwater water bodies in Scotland. These have been defined by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency in line with the requirements of The Water Environment (Drinking Water Protected Areas) (Scotland) Order 2013. The dataset is required to fulfil the requirements of the European Union Water Framework Directive.

Indicator 6: Freshwater

The ecological and chemical condition of Scotland’s freshwaters is monitored to support the River Basin Management Plan process and to ensure that regulation of activities and pressures is improving the condition of freshwaters and securing the sustainable use of the water environment.

State of the environment report 2011: Water - Groundwater

Scotland's groundwater is a hugely valuable hidden asset. It underpins communities in rural Scotland, providing 75% of private drinking water supplies. It also supplies 70% of the water bottled by the distilling industry.

Future water pressures and associated drivers

Graph showing future water pressures and associated drivers.

State of the environment report 2011: Water - Estuaries

Estuaries are important transport routes and many contain ports and harbours, which attract industry and large centres of population, they also provide valuable habitats and breeding grounds for fish and birds. In the past, waste water, generated by people and industry, flowed untreated into industrialised estuaries causing serious pollution.

Coastal Classifications

Coastal water bodies created for the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC)

State of the environment report 2014: Water

Scotland has around 19,000 km of coastline, which makes up 8% of Europe's coast. The area from the coast to our fishery limits (470,000 km2) is around six times the size of the land area of Scotland.

Bathing Water points

Extents of bathing waters defined by The Scottish Government and SEPA as required by The Revised Bathing Waters Directive (2006/7/EC)

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Freshwater lochs

Scotland’s lochs are an important part of our landscape and provide water for drinking and power generation as well as space for recreation. They are generally in good condition.

State of the environment report 2011: Water - Scotland's seas

Scotland's seas extend from 3 nautical miles (the Water Framework Directive (WFD) limit) to 200 nautical miles (the fisheries limit) with a sea area of 420,863 km2. Within this, the limit of territorial waters is at 12 miles. Scotland's seas include the area seawards of the 12 mile limit which is usually referred to as "offshore waters", as well as that area of territorial waters between 3 and 12 miles and seawards of the WFD Coastal waters.

Main river and coastal catchments

WMS service of SEPA datasets relating to the water environment.

Water clarity & pH video transcript

In today's world, ponds are at threat from a variety of pollution sources, from pollution waste from agricultural and industry to just everyday waste in our lives. Pollution can lead to an increase in nutrients in the pond leading to eutrophication - this means the water will become cloudy; less clear; allowing less light into the water. This means plants won't be able to photosynthesise and produce oxygen. Without that, a lot of animals living in the pond would die.

River Classifications

River water bodies created for the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC)

Water infographic

Scotland has around 19,000 km of coastline, which makes up 8% of Europe's coast. The area from the coast to our fishery limits (470,000 km2) is around six times the size of the land area of Scotland.

The Scottish Government: Scotland's Marine Atlas - Locations & treatment types of waste water treatment plants

Information for The National Marine Plan - Waste water treatment is designed to process waste water whilst protecting the environment and maintaining public health.

Bathing waters

View the expected European bathing water quality classifications under the new Directive and historic water quality monitoring data from all of Scotland's designated bathing waters. This data is presented along with additional information on your bathing water of interest – bathing water quality predictions (15 May to 15 September), UKHO tidal predictions and Met Office weather forecasts. Monitoring results for other parameters, including salinity, macroalgae, marine phytoplankton, cyanobacteria, litter and sewage are available to view.

Loch Classification

Lake water bodies created for the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC)

River Basin Districts

River Basin Districts WFD - River water bodies were designated on the basis of WFD United Kingdom Technical Advisory Group (UKTAG) guidance. Reviewed annually based upon new information relating to pressures.

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Aquaculture

Aquaculture is a growing and increasingly important industry in Scotland. It helps to underpin sustainable economic growth in rural and coastal communities, particularly in the Highlands and Islands, with many depending on the employment and revenue it provides.

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Estuaries

Scottish estuaries are important resources for wildlife and humans, and 85% are in good or high environmental condition. However, they remain under pressure from human activity, particularly from nutrient enrichment and the damaging impacts of climate change.

State of the environment report 2014: Gaelic - Water

Tha uisge Alba riatanach airson ar slàinte is ar soirbheachaidh. Cho math ri bhith air a chleachdadh airson òl, tha uisge air a chleachdadh ann an gnìomhachas (me, taighean-staile an uisge-bheatha agus taic do obair-iasgaich), airson lùth a chruthachadh (dealan-uisge), agus airson chur-seachadan (mar coimhead-eòin, iasgach agus spòrs-uisge).

State of the environment report 2011: Water - Lochs

Scotland’s lochs are renowned worldwide as part of our cultural identity (e.g. Loch Lomond and Loch Ness). Our lochs are reputed for their beauty, and form a dramatic component of Scotland’s landscape. Lochs are valued recreational resources, used for boating, fishing, kayaking and nature watching, and they support tourism and other economic benefits.

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Estuaries & coastal

Scottish coastal and estuarine habitats are full of rich, diverse and fragile sea life that is under considerable pressure and shows signs of damage, but may be recovered through sustainable management.

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Offshore waters

Our seas are biologically diverse and relatively unpolluted. Some fishing is unsustainable, and energy production competes for space and increases pollution risks.

State of the environment report 2014: Water - Coastal waters

Almost all (97%) of Scotland’s coastal waters are in good or high condition, but there are local impacts from commercial fishing, aquaculture and diffuse pollution. Growth in industries such as aquaculture and renewable energy may increase pressure on coastal waters.

State of the environment report 2011: Water - Coastal waters

Good quality Scottish coastal waters are important to the Scottish economy. The majority are high or good quality, but there are local impacts from commercial fishing, aquaculture and diffuse pollution. The growth in industries such as aquaculture and renewable energy is putting additional pressure on the coastal environment.

Working together to bring fish home

Saturday 21 April 2018 is World Fish Migration day, a global event to create awareness of the importance of keeping rivers free from man-made barriers to fish migration. In Scotland, we know of hundreds of man-made barriers that are preventing fish from accessing essential spawning habitat in our rivers. But it’s likely that there are many more out there that we don’t know about. To help us identify where these barrier are, we have developed a barrier recording ‘app' that can be downloaded to a smartphone and used to help us to help the fish. Here you can also find more information about this project and how to get involved.

2014 state of the environment report

The 2014 state of the environment report provides an assessment of Scotland’s environment and how it is changing. It is based on assessments that have used data from a wide range of sources. It was written by expert authors from different environmental organisations.

More about this hub

This Citizen Science Scottish Freshwater Hub is the place to find out everything you want to know, and how to get involved in, citizen science projects in Scottish rivers, lochs and wetlands.

Anglers Riverfly Monitoring Initiative in Scotland

The Riverfly Partnership is UK wide initiative bringing together anglers, conservationists, entomologists, scientists, water course managers and relevant authorities to protect and conserve the river environment. The project trains local enthusiasts to carry out sampling and counting of freshwater invertebrate animals to detect changes in the quality of river water.

HabMoS - Fresh Water

The freshwater layer contains basic habitat information for lochs and rivers. Scottish Natural Heritage is coordinating the development of a Habitat Map of Scotland, a stated objective of Scotland's 2020 Biodiversity Strategy. For the first time this will bring together all the habitat information available for Scotland and display it in one place and in a common classification - providing a unique tool for the management of our natural heritage.

Useful links

A collection of education resources that compliment the Scottish curriculum for excellence on several topics including: air, water, land, climate, transport, energy ans citizen science.

Scottish invasive species initiative

Work alongside other volunteers and project staff to remove target invasive non-native species from across northern Scotland.

Rainfall observers

The data is used to support important services such as weather and flood forecasting, and the management of our water resources.

Wetlands

Scotland's wetlands are home to a wide range of plants and animals. They also provide important environmental functions such as storing carbon and sustaining the supply of clean water.

Data analysis

Data analysis applications present data in an interactive format of graphs, tables and maps. Export data views as images, CSV files and PDF documents for use in reports and presentations

National Scenic Areas

National Scenic Areas are Scotland's only national landscape designation. They are those areas of land considered of national significance on the basis of their outstanding scenic interest which must be conserved as part of the country's natural heritage. They have been selected for their charachteristic features of scenery comprising a mixture of richly diverse landscapes including prominent landforms, coastline, sea and fresh water lochs, rivers, woodland and moorlands.

2011 state of the environment report

The 2011 state of the environment report provides an authoritative and impartial assessment of the state of the Scotland’s environment. Many of the public bodies who are responsible for regulating and improving the environment, worked together for the first time, to describe the condition of our environment

SmartRivers

SmartRivers enables volunteer ‘hubs’, supported by an IFM certified training scheme, to sample and analyse invertebrates to a near-professional standard.

Northern February Red Stonefly

Every February Buglife launches its citizen science project The Hunt for the Northern February Red.  The Northern February red stonefly (Brachyptera putata) has its global stronghold in the Scottish Highlands

Our environment

Find out more about the issues facing Scotland's environment, with links to useful data, contacts and information from our partners.

Baseline Confluence Inter Catchments

Baseline Confluence Inter Catchments

Baseline Confluences Nested Catchments

Baseline Confluences Nested Catchments

River and loch waterbody nested catchments

River and loch waterbody nested catchments

The great nurdle hunt

By looking for nurdles on your local beach you can have fun and help show the local plastics industry their impact on our estuary. Your findings will help us persuade industry to take up the challenge of making the Firth of Forth the first zero nurdle loss estuary in the UK.

Potential impacts of climate change

Scotland’s river quality has improved in recent decades. Almost half of our rivers are now of good or better quality. Plans are in place to improve the remaining poorer-quality rivers.

Standing Waters Sample Points

The Standing Waters Sample Points dataset is a GIS dataset of survey sample locations used during the course of the Scottish Loch Survey Project. The statutory nature conservation agencies in Scotland, England and Wales have a long history of carrying out routine aquatic plant (macrophyte) surveys of lakes.

Groundwater classification

Groundwater classifications in Scotland

Estuaries classification

Estuaries classification

The adventures of 'Where's Willie' continue

This month Willie takes us on a trip to his old stomping grounds of Sutherland and shares his thoughts on the changes he's seen over his career as a soil scientist.

SPRI Waste transfers

SPRI (Scottish Pollution Release Inventory) waste release sites in Scotland

Land

Scotland's land is a valuable asset. It has evolved over billions of years and is constantly changing. Subsurface, land provides us with valuable resources (minerals, ores, aggregates and fuel). On its surface, we grow food and timber, build roads and houses, and much of our water filters through it. Land stores carbon and supports a wide range of habitats and species.

Energy - Broad general education (Early to fourth level)

This learning resource about energy was written by a qualified school teacher and compliments the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. This is aimed at Broad General Education - early to fourth level.

Data

Data underpins environmental assessments, research and decision making. Scotland's environment web transforms data into graphs and charts to assist analysis at different geographical scales, recommends mobile apps to view data "on the go" and provides links to useful environmental data sources.

The Scottish Government: Scotland's Marine Atlas - Location & type of industrial marine discharge

Information for The National Marine Plan - Waste water treatment is designed to process waste water whilst protecting the environment and maintaining public health.

Other map tools

Scotland’s environment web partners have produced a range of useful maps that will help you find trusted and authoritative data.

Videos

The 2014 state of Scotland’s environment report describes the condition of our environment and how it is changing. Listen to some experts describe Scotland’s environment.

State of the environment

The state of Scotland’s environment report describes the condition of our environment and how it is changing. It discusses the main pressures affecting the environment and outlines some of the things that are being done to look after it.

Biosphere Reserves (Scotland)

Biosphere Reserves are areas of terrestrial and coastal ecosystems promoting the conservation of biodiversity with sustainable use. Biosphere reserves serve to demonstrate integrated management of land, water and biodiversity.

Landscape-scale conservation - Case Study - Strathard Initiative - A landscape to live, work and play

This project aims to improve land and water management decisions in Strathard, a rural area of western Scotland located in the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park. In order to develop more sustainable and resilient land and water management plans, an ecosystems approach is being used.

Get learning - Functions of wetlands & benefits

Scotland's wetlands are home to a wide range of plants and animals. They also provide important environmental functions such as storing carbon and sustaining the supply of clean water.

Pond dipping video transcript

There are many indicators of pollution for fresh water, but today we're going to look at the invertebrates, some of which are sensitive to pollution, and some of which are not so sensitive.

State of the environment report 2014: Land - Wetlands

Scotland's wetlands are home to a wide range of plants and animals. They also provide important environmental functions such as storing carbon and sustaining the supply of clean water.

Scotland’s seas

Scotland has around 18,000 km of coastline (when measured at 1:10,000 scale). The area from the coast to our EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone) limits (462,263 km2) is around six times the size of the land area of Scotland.

Indicator 9: Acid and nitrogen pollution - critical load exceedance

Critical loads are thresholds for the deposition of pollutants causing acidification and/or eutrophication above which significant harm to sensitive habitats may occur.

Nitrate Vulnerable Zones

Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) are areas within Scotland that contain surface water or groundwater that is susceptible to nitrate pollution from agricultural activities. They are designated in accordance with the requirements of the European Commision's Nitrates Directive 91/676/EEC, aims to protect water quality across Europe by preventing nitrates from agricultural sources polluting ground and surface waters and by promoting the use of good farming practices.

Soils

Scotland’s soils are an important natural resource. They play an essential part in all our lives, providing us with a wide range of benefits. Some of these benefits are obvious, like growing food, while many are less clear, like filtering water, reducing flood risk and influencing climate.

Soil texture video transcript

Soil texture can influence soil in a number of ways. If a soil is very sandy like this one, it's not very good at holding on to nutrients, yet its ability for water to enter it and pass through it is very good; so drainage is excellent in a sandy soil. If you've got a soil with a lot of clay, its ability to hold on to nutrients is excellent; but it also holds on to a lot of moisture too, which can lead to very damp or even water-logged conditions.

Ecosystem health indicators

People are part of ecosystems. We benefit from the services they provide from clean water to the health benefits of a walk in the woods. Ecosystem health is a measure of the status of ecosystems.

Condition indicators

Condition indicators tell us whether an ecosystem is in a good state. They include indicators of habitat, species and resources, such as water and carbon.

Sites of Special Scientific Interest

Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) are those areas of land and water (to the seaward limits of local authority areas or MLWS) that Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) considers to best represent our natural heritage - its diversity of plants, animals and habitats, rocks and landforms, or a combinations of such natural features.

State and trend assessment

A summary report card on the state and trend assessments of the 2014 state of environment report. Independent expert assessments of current state and future trends are shown as a series of spectrum diagrams.

Earthworms video transcript

Earthworms are very important for soil health for a couple of different reasons. They mix in and contribute to the breakdown of organic matter in the soil; they aerate the soil, stopping it becoming too compressed; and they create plenty of space underground, meaning that water can drain away freely.

Tree height video transcript

Measuring the growth of a tree over time provides us with important information about the life of the tree and also about the ecosystem in which it's growing. Growth rates reflect on the amount of water, nutrients and carbohydrates that are available to the tree and this can change from season to season; site to site; and year to year.

Land infographic

Scotland’s land is a fundamental asset. We grow food and timber on it; we build our houses and roads on it; much of our water filters through and is purified by it; it stores carbon and it supports a range of habitats and species, some of which are internationally important.

An economic assessment of waste crime enforcement in Scotland

Environmental crime is the breaking of environmental law by individuals or companies who carry out activities which could have an impact on the environment. Environmental crimes include unlicensed waste operations including transport, storage, treatment and disposal, illegal discharges to the water environment, unauthorised abstractions and illegal emissions to air.

State of the environment report 2014: Land

Scotland’s land is a fundamental asset. We grow food and timber on it; we build our houses and roads on it; much of our water filters through and is purified by it; it stores carbon and it supports a range of habitats and species, some of which are internationally important.

State of the environment report 2014: People & the environment - Benefits from the environment

We all depend on a wide range of essential benefits provided by the environment for our day to day existence, including the air we breathe, the food we eat and the water we drink. By managing the environment well we can greatly improve our quality of life.

State of the environment report 2014: People & the environment - Land use strategy

Scotland’s land provides us with a wealth of benefits, such as food, timber, clean water, energy, and a space for recreation. However, we still demand more. The Land Use Strategy addresses how we can sustainably manage our land to ensure we get the most from it.

State of the environment report 2011: Land

Scotland’s land is a fundamental asset. It provides a range of economic, social and environmental benefits vital for our health and prosperity. We grow food and timber on it, build our houses and roads on it, much of our water filters through and is purified by it, it stores carbon and supports a range of habitats and species, some of which are rare on an international scale.

State of the environment report 2011: Introduction

Scotland’s environment is world-famous and generates wealth for Scotland, both directly (e.g. providing water for the whisky industry, growing crops and timber) and indirectly (e.g. through tourism and the recreation opportunities afforded by a healthy environment). A recent study valued the benefits provided by Scotland’s environment at up to £23.5 billion per year.

State of the environment report 2011: Society

The environment provides a wide range of essential goods and services on which our health and well-being depend, including food, clean air and water. Our environment needs to be managed to maximise the provision of these ecosystem services while minimising any damage to them.

Useful data sources

Increasing amounts of data are being published and shared to improve our understanding, inform decision making, and underpin research. Here are links to recommended sources of trusted and authoritative data.

Habitats and species

Scotland's environment supports a wide and diverse range of species, and consists of a complex mosaic of habitats which makes up our rich and varied landscape.

Bloomin Algae

Bloomin’ Algae is a citizen science app that encourages the public and water-related businesses to report the presence of harmful blooms of blue-green algae in freshwaters. The app helps speed up public health warnings and teach you how to recognise the risks to you and your pets.

Issue 4 - October 2013

There have been some big changes to the Scotland’s environment website. We are very pleased to announce the new look design of the homepage.

State of the environment report 2011: Overall summary

Scotland’s environment is generally in a good condition. It is world-famous and generates wealth for Scotland, both directly (e.g. supporting fisheries, providing water for the whisky industry, growing crops and timber) and indirectly (e.g. benefiting human health, through tourism and the recreation opportunities that a healthy environment affords). A recent study valued the benefits provided by Scotland’s environment to be worth up to £23.5 billion per year.

Indicator 7: Soil carbon

Scotland’s soils contains a lot of organic matter in the form of living and dead material from plants and animals. This forms the soil organic carbon which, when properly managed, help improve soil fertility and water retention, maintaining soil structure and biodiversity.

Waterway survey

Help us find out how Daubenton’s bat populations are faring. For this survey, you walk a route along a 1km stretch of water allocated to you on two evenings during August. You record bat activity using a bat detector to listen and a torch to observe simple visual clues.

Landscape-scale conservation

“The future of landscape-scale conservation is not just about delivering more, bigger, better and joined up nature reserves. It is also about winning hearts and minds.” Sir John Lawton Landscape-scale conservation involves working in collaboration at a big scale to deliver more benefits for the environment and people.

Citizen science portal

Covering topics as diverse as weather, soils, air quality, water quality and fascinating wildlife such as lampreys and riverflies, this portal provides an ideal way for you to get involved in citizen science projects. It makes it easy for you to gather, share, view and discuss your data with people that are interested in the same things as you.

Scottish Pollution Release Inventory

SPRI is a database of annual mass releases of specified pollutants to air, water and land and off-site transfers of waste from SEPA regulated industrial sites. It provides emission values and waste transfers over specified reporting thresholds but also indicates when a site releases a pollutant below the threshold. SPRI emissions data is available from 2002 and waste data from 2007. Please note, this page is up dated quarterly, more up to date data may be available on SEPA's SPRI website. This application is aimed at those with an interest in industrial emission and waste generating information and trends – the public, academics and educational institutions, researchers, businesses, local and national government etc.

Scotland's peatland: enduring through time

Guest blog from Dr Patricia Bruneau at SNH on Scotland’s peatland. Peatlands are places where soils meet with water to create unique habitats that have been enduring for millennia. These bogs also play an essential role in our lives. But having been exposed to too many pressures they are now in need of more attention if we want to secure their long term future.

Project archive

SEPA successfully applied to the LIFE+ Programme for matched funding to support Scotland's environment web partnership initiative. A project with a total value of 4.8 million Euros commenced on September 1st 2011, for development of the Scotland's environment web partnership and website until August 2015.

Capturing Scotland's rainfall patterns

Scottish weather is often dreich, but never dull. We subconsciously include a daily weather observation in our pleasantries, which is not surprising considering its bearing in all aspects of life and the general mood of the nation. Taking this obsession a step further, there is a long tradition of rainfall measuring by the public. As well as being an interesting hobby, the data is very useful and SEPA is keen to encourage members of the public, schools and businesses to begin rainfall observing to help capture Scotland complex rainfall patterns.

It's all about... our fabulous forests and wonderful woodlands Part 2

In this instalment we take a closer look at what the Scotland’s environment partners are doing to help protect and improve our forests and woodlands, and how you can get involved.

River partnership shortlisted for Nature of Scotland Award

The partnership in charge of looking after the river Dee catchment in north east Scotland is a finalist in the Nature of Scotland Awards.

Beltie Burn Restoration Blog

Blog on the Restoration of the Beltie Burn by the Dee Partnership Group

Mobile apps

Here are some mobile apps that can help you get involved and record your observations about the environment. Get in touch and let us know about any other useful apps that you would like us to share, please contact us.

Riverfly on the Esk

Riverfly on the Esk is a citizen science project located on the River Esk in Midlothian. It joins a nationwide network of Riverfly Partnership groups across the UK, monitoring freshwater invertebrates as indicators of river health.

Issue 3 - May 2013

For the first time, the state of Scotland’s environment is being summarised by a range of expert panels.

Rocks and landforms

Scotland’s rocks and landforms provide a range of benefits and help us to understand how the Earth has evolved. They provide us with valuable economic resources and naturally regulate hazards and flooding.

Habitat Map of Scotland

The 2020 Challenge for Scotland’s biodiversity made a commitment to produce a “comprehensive map of Scotland’s main habitats”. It maps habitats and major land uses using EUNIS and Habitats Directive classications.

Useful videos

Videos have been produced to help you with data sampling, collection and recording - produced in partnership with Education Scotland and OPAL (Open Air Laboratories). In addition there are some State of the environment videos listed here also.

A bloomin’ year for algae and cyanobacteria

Summers are becoming hotter and drier, with winter rainfall and storm frequency predicted to increase. These effects of climate change are ideal conditions to also give rise to increased incidence of algal and blue-green algal (cyanobacteria) blooms in Scottish freshwaters.

Whale Track

Join a community of citizen scientists monitoring whales and dolphins on the west coast of Scotland. Report your sightings to help track the movements of coastal species such as bottlenose dolphins and uncover the mysteries of rare visitors including humpback and killer whales.

Rainfall observers

Across Scotland, volunteer Rainfall Observers are collecting extremely valuable rainfall data on a daily basis to improve weather and flood forecasting. SEPA would love you to join this band of volunteers, and has created a brand new online portal to make it easy to gather and share your data.

It's all about... our marine environment

With around 19,000km of coastline (that's 8% of Europe's coast) we are quite literally surrounded by the sea - supporting our economy, environment, culture and well-being.

Rainfall observers – long service awards

In this blog, we’re shining a light on, and celebrating, some of Scotland’s most dedicated volunteer rainfall observers, who have been actively recording rainfall data, every day for decades – some dating as far back as the 1960’s. This is extremely valuable data to record in all weathers – even during the dry spell that we’ve had recently.

Scotlands environment map

Search and discover spatial data published by our partner organisations. View data individually or in any combination that you choose and share your data view . Search by postcode, grid reference, location or use the geolocate function to explore data within your current location.

It's all about... you and science

Citizen science is about getting everyone, from experts to amateur biologists, school children or enthusiastic beginners, involved in science.

Woodland and forests

Scotland’s woodlands and forests support a wide range of important plants and animals. Rare and threatened species are more often found in and around semi-natural woodlands, but many have also colonised planted forests.

Our rocks and landforms: the 'great stone book' of Scotland

Over the next few weeks we’ll be taking a closer look at the topic rocks and landforms; exploring the exciting projects our partners are working on in this area and looking at the maps, data tools and information available on our website to help you find out more about this fascinating topic. And to get things started, in this first blog we’ve asked Hugh Barron from the British Geological Survey (BGS) to explain more about why rocks and landforms are an important part of Scotland’s environment.

Energy - Senior phase

This learning resource about energy was written by a qualified school teacher and compliments the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. This is aimed at Senior level.

Indicator 13: Soil sealing

Covering soil with a waterproof material or structure, e.g. tarmac or buildings, (known as soil sealing) means it is effectively lost to the ecosystem. It is one of the causes of soil damage which often lead to irreversible loss of soil functions.

Waste and resources

The most successful countries in the 21st century will be resource efficient, circular economies which do not produce significant quantities of waste. Products, materials and resources will be used for as long as possible and maximum value will be derived from them.

Explore ecosystem health indicators

Ecosystem health indicators are measures which help us to understand where action should be taken to restore ecosystem health and associated benefits.

It's all about... our natural health service

Looking at the importance of getting out and about in Scotland's environment and the benefits to mental and physical health as a result. Also looks at what partner organisations are doing to contribute to the health agenda.

Exciting new biodiversity analysis tools - Habitat Map of Scotland and Ecosystem health indicators

Guest blog from Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) on the exciting new addition to our website of the Habitat Map of Scotland, a great new composite map tool, pulling together habitat and land use data to help support policy and management decisions, and the Ecosystem health indicators section, providing valuable information on the status of our ecosystems.

Where's Willie this week?

As an Orcadian, my appreciation of trees and their various benefits, or even the fact that they existed as an important component of the countryside, came comparatively late to me.

Issue 1 - September 2012

Scotland’s environment web has created a new working partnership between Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Natural Heritage and the Forestry Commission Scotland to develop a new interactive mapping tool on the their website.

Issue 6 - May 2015

Future funding support announced for Scotland’s environment web

Mobile apps

Here are some apps that can help view and interact with environmental data on your mobile device. Get in touch and let us know about any other useful apps that you would like us to share, please contact us.

Meet the people behind the map: part one

Mapvember blog: As users, we interact with maps and spatial data on daily basis. But do we give much thought to how these applications are developed? How does all of this data reach the map applications that we use? And who builds them? During Mapvember we catch-up with members of the SEPA team responsible for spatial data and development of the Scotland’s environment map, to find out more about what they do and get to know the people behind the map.

Meet our partners... Scottish Natural Heritage

In our second blog of the series about our partners, we hear from Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) about why they are excited about being part of the Scotland's environment web collaboration.

Other useful resources

Get involved! You can improve your understanding of the environment and learn new skills; meet new people who have similar interests to your own; improve both your health and wellbeing. Here are link to freely available resources to help you get involved in citizen science and action.

Plants and animals

Scotland is renowned worldwide as being a place of outstanding natural beauty. We owe that reputation to the diverse range of Scotland’s biodiversity – plants, animals, and habitats. Scotland’s nature can, and does, inspire our people. We owe our own wellbeing to our biodiversity and it’s vital that we all play our part in safeguarding it and reducing the threats facing it.

Changing climate

Scotland generally has cool summers, mild winters and rain falls throughout the year. Changes in our climate over the next few decades are unavoidable because of the greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere.

Project actions and workstreams

SEPA successfully applied to the LIFE+ Programme for matched funding to support Scotland's environment web partnership initiative. The project was achieved through the following set of actions which have been summarised. Extract from the LIFE+ Project Document - Detailed Technical Description of the proposed actions.

Issue 7 - September 2015

Leading Edge: Putting Scotland in the forefront of information sharing, data visualisation and citizen engagement

Land - Senior phase

This learning resource about land was written by a qualified school teacher and compliments the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. This is aimed at Senior level.

Land - Broad general education (Early to fourth level)

This learning resource about land was written by a qualified school teacher and compliments the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. This is aimed at Broad General Education - early to fourth level.

It's all about... waste

We all produce it, households and businesses alike. While as a nation we might be starting to reduce the amount we produce and recycle more, waste is still a very real problem facing our environment.

Love is in the air quality... all you need to know for Scotland

Fifty years on from the introduction of the Clean Air Act, air pollution is still one of the biggest environmental threats we face.